Film review of Wonder Woman

June 12, 2017

This film review of “Wonder Woman” appeared in the Australian Jewish News on 8 June 2017

Directed by Patty Jenkins; written by Allan Heinberg; starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright, Danny Huston, David Thewlis, Connie Nielsen and Elena Anaya

*****

The world has a new Jewish female star, and her name is Gal Gadot. This former Israel Defense Force combat instructor is also the grand-daughter of Holocaust survivors, a former “Miss Israel” and professional model.

But none of this background prepares you for the fact that Gal Gadot can act. In “Wonder Woman”, which opened world-wide last week, Gadot plays “Diana Prince”, a daughter of the Amazons who grows up surrounded by warrior women on the remote island of Themyscira. This fictional island-state is, as with most things in this film, a creation of DC Comics. As a young girl, Diana is fed stories of Greek mythology by her mother, Queen Hippolyta (Danish actress Connie Nielsen) and taught combat skills by her aunt, General Antiope (Robin Wright, Claire Underwood from “House of Cards”).

“Wonder Woman” follows in the super-hero tradition of “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”, Gadot’s previous big film. But director Patty Jenkins and Jewish screenwriter Allan Heinberg bring a difference: while most super-hero films are bloated special effects extravaganzas, “Wonder Woman” drives its story through characters.  And there are loads of them, all well-drawn and frequently very funny.

After Diana Prince, the most important character is Steve Trevor (Chris Pine, who played James T. Kirk in the most recent “Star Trek” films). Steve is an undercover American agent who has stolen German weapon secrets: oh yeah, the year is 1918, and World War I is coming to a fitful close. He escapes by stealing a plane and crash-lands near Themyscira. Diana saves his life, after which the Amazons battle pursuing German soldiers.

Diana and Steve make their way to England (eerily, we know it’s London because the first image we see is the London Bridge), and then on to Belgium to track down and destroy the German secret weapon. They are accompanied by a cast of oddball characters with special skills, who mostly fulfil the “humorous sidekick” requirements of the super-hero movie genre.

There’s nothing unusual about the plot – Wonder Woman saves the day (whoops, I gave it away) – but the fun is in the telling, in the characters themselves and the occasional great dialogue. Gadot plays a delightful Wonder Woman, wide-eyed, naïve, idealistic and a true warrior. Gadot’s on-screen chemistry with Chris Pine is funny, believable (well, for a super-hero fantasy), nicely nuanced and romantic. They combine to create one of the best “buddy” movies of the year.

For Jewish audiences two fabulous lines – both said by Gadot – stand out, both (we hope) purposefully ironic: “Once the Germans are freed from his [the bad guy’s] influence, they will be good men again.” Spoken in 1918; we all know how that one worked out. And in London, Diana upbraids the British army brass saying, “Where I come from, generals don’t hide in their offices. They fight alongside their soldiers.”

At almost 2 hours and 20 minutes, “Wonder Woman” is over-long. It starts slowly and ends with a ritualised super-hero battle seen too often in these films. But it’s funny, highly entertaining and will be a real audience pleaser. Gal Gadot will soon be – if she is not already – one of the most sought-after actors in the world. And one of the world’s most famous Israelis. The power of the big screen.

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